If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site
We are OPEN and follow CDC guidelines
Monday, 11 January 2021 00:00

Athlete’s foot is a contagious infection of the skin on the feet. This infection is caused by a fungus entering the top layer of skin through a small crack or wound. Symptoms of athlete’s foot can include reddened, cracked, flakey, or itchy skin on the foot and between the toes. Certain factors can increase your risk of developing athlete’s foot. These include having a genetic predisposition to infections, allergies, eczema, a weakened immune system, and poor circulation in the lower limbs. Having very sweaty feet and participating in sports like running and swimming can also make you more likely to catch athlete’s foot since the fungus lives and thrives in warm, moist environments. If you think you are afflicted with athlete’s foot, it is recommended that you see a podiatrist for treatment. 

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot & Ankle Center.  Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Athlete’s Foot
Monday, 04 January 2021 00:00

Peripheral neuropathy is a condition in which the nerves of the peripheral nervous system become damaged or diseased. These nerves are responsible for sending messages from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body. The nerves of the feet are often affected as well. Every nerve in your peripheral system has a specific function. Motor nerve neuropathy affects the nerves responsible for muscle movement, while sensory neuropathy affects the nerves responsible for feeling sensation. Autonomic nerves control functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, and digestion. Symptoms vary based on the type of neuropathy that you have. Broadly, the symptoms one might experience due to peripheral neuropathy include burning, prickling, or tingling sensations in the feet, sharp pains, numbness, and muscle weakness. If you think that you are afflicted with peripheral neuropathy in your feet, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for treatment.   

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with one of our podiatrists from Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Neuropathy
Monday, 28 December 2020 00:00

A burning sensation in the heel can be a troubling symptom. Burning pain in the heel or bottom of the foot that has a tingling or prickling quality, causes numbness, feels hot, and is worse at night may be indicative of nerve damage or  a disorder affecting the nerves that supply the foot. There are many conditions that can cause this type of damage, including diabetic neuropathy, physical trauma or injuries, tarsal tunnel syndrome, autoimmune diseases, and certain infections. If you have burning heel pain, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist. A podiatrist can help diagnose the cause of your pain and find the right treatment for you.  

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists of Michigan Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Livonia, and Southfield, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain
Monday, 21 December 2020 00:00

Gout is a painful, inflammatory form of arthritis. Those affected will typically feel an intense stiffness in the joints of their feet, particularly in the big toe. Schedule a visit to learn about how gout can be managed and treated.

Livonia
South Tower Professional Building
(734) 591-6612
(734) 591-6625 Fax

14555 Levan Road
Suite E-302
Livonia, MI 48154
Southfield
Chemical Bank
(248) 353-9300
(248) 353-9303 Fax

24725 W. 12 Mile Road
Suite 270
Southfield, MI 48034

Copyright © Michigan Foot & Ankle     |     Site Map     |     Nondiscrimination     |     Design by: Podiatry Content Connection